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Music in marketing is "more memorable than visuals"

Music in marketing is "more memorable than visuals"

Music in advertising is often an afterthought. Millward Brown estimate that brands spend a mammoth 84% of time and money on visual branding. But a new survey suggests that marketers should be prioritising sound in their advertising.

Audio branding company PHMG surveyed 1,000 UK consumers to gauge their reactions to music. Their results show that 60% of respondents think that music in marketing is more memorable than visuals. In addition, 45% believe that music helps them understand a brand's personality, while 47% say it helps them feel more connected to a brand.

“Our hearing is a more powerful emotional sense than our sight, so there is a clear opportunity for businesses to broaden their marketing horizons and gain a competitive edge by making better use of audio,” Daniel Lafferty, Director of Music and Voice at PHMG, explains.

“It is so important to build a brand that accurately reflects the various desired attributes – audio and visuals should be designed to complement each other in pursuit of this goal.”

The survey also tested consumers' reactions to different types of sound. Instrumentation, style, and mode all played a significant role in brand perceptions.

Acoustic instruments faired particularly well. For example, 91% felt that acoustic guitar was calm, caring and sophisticated. Other acoustic instruments also gave the impression of honesty and transparency. Unsurprisingly, 90% of participants associated short, sharp major strings with excitement and happiness, while the same style in a minor key provoked sadness and melancholy.

Brian Eno and Thom Yorke to feature in immersive audio-visual exhibition

Brian Eno and Thom Yorke to feature in immersive audio-visual exhibition

The sound of the underground: The audio identity of the London's transport system

The sound of the underground: The audio identity of the London's transport system